New Line of Fine Art Silk Cashmere Just Out

Dear Friends,
I’m exited to share with you my latest collection of art on VIDA, a gallery of fine clothing! For every product sold, VIDA will provide the gift of literacy to the clothing makers they work with, so please assist them by shopping the collection at:
http://shopvida.com/collections/voices/jill-annette-johnson
Thank you!

World Healing Day, April 30, 2016

Have you ever noticed in online searches that sometimes the relevant information gets lost in the amount of information? Such is the case with World Healing Day. On Google search there are several references to several different dates for World Healing Day could easily be confused with a myriad of other more specific healing days. Although most are likely positive and beneficial, the one having to do with the the open-ended transmission of healing energy that is beneficial to all is on the last Saturday of every April, and includes related events on every day of the weekend surrounding it.

On April 30, 2016 the vibration of the conscious energies of millions of people throughout the world will focus on “One World, One Breath”. Anyone wanting to participate in World Healing Day is welcome and can be assured they are joining with global consciousness if they mark calendars for April 30, 2016.

The power of group consciousness directed toward an aim such as peace has been tested, and has proven astonishing results of at least a 70% drop in violence, warfare, and terrorism, according to Permanent Peace Organization. Quantum physicists and scholars alike have carefully scrutinized the power of meditation in and find results are consistent and nearly immediate, when people collectively focus on an end-result of healing or peace while in a relaxed delta state of meditation, the focus becomes reality.

If you would like to see a fascinating ongoing study of meditative phenomenon such as brain painting, random data tapestries, and music in data, check out The Global Consciousness Project of Princeton University, and what better way to promote world peace can there be than to involve a university of minds simultaneously on World Healing Day?

The founder of World Healing Day, Bill Douglas, set this forth as a day we can meditate, pray, and focus on the mantra “One World, One Breath”. Mr. Douglas has provided us with a central point to integrate universals of mind, body, and spirit at worldtaichiday.org. Here you will find worldwide and real-time videos of the these events, along with an abundance of resources and connections to the events.

Does anyone else have the honor of a birthday that falls on April 30? For my part in celebrating my own birthday, I will be offering 99 healing art and music videos regarding; reiki, qi, meditations, readings, visualizations, and additional resources on youtube and on jilljj.com. These videos are designed to assist with reaching a calm and focused state of meditation in which you may begin to heal yourself and others, bring peace into being, experience delta frequency waves of art and music, and learn a multitude of techniques you can use to create inner and outer peace.

Art therapy has been a topic of my recent research, and in doing so, I have found a multifaceted meditative approach as demonstrated in these videos to good effect and makes meditation easier to assimilate and understand. Ultimately, they were designed to bring peace online and into hearts. In a most recent video I have had the privilege of working with a prodigy and truly inspired musician, Suduaya who naturally includes waves of abundant love and peace in his music. I hope you attend and meditate with me and the many bright minds and hearts as we focus on the peace of unity.

In searching these resources, you will find a collage of helpful information covering many groups throughout the world as they practice he events being held that day including; tai chi, qigong, yoga, prayer, healing, meditation, art, music, reiki, and dance. It is an opportunity to hone these skills while connecting with energy to heal self, others, and our precious planet.


Suduaya Shaman, Meditative Video for World Healing

This huge meditative party of collective consciousness happens to be a day to celebrate. It would be great to acknowledge just how many guests plan on attending this event. If you are planning on spending this day celebrating with us, and with me on my birthday, we hope to see a comment or thumbs up from you, your friends, neighbors, and your families, on April 30, 2016, a Saturday, which is reason enough to take a breath, relax, meditate, and take another breath,and Om with the world.

Namaste’

Jill Annette Johnson

Jill is an artist, writer, reiki practitioner, and farmer, who lives in the heart of Minnesota. She graduated quite honorably from SCSU with a Bachelor of Science in Art Education, and is currently studying art therapy and healing techniques.
In her daily life, she integrates and promotes the concepts of holistic mind, body, and spirit with her works and shares her portfolio of experiences at jilljj.com
   
OmWorld8

OmWorld8                                                                                     

Kaliedoscopes, Mandalas, Beautiful Backgrounds

A voyage of self-discovery and therapy is available through art. Let me become the perfect guide with this journey of empowerment, discovery and joy.

Are you are aware that humans think in images a lot more than they think in words?
I provide an opportunity just within to further improve our outlook, perspective, attention, awareness, and manage stress, and improve thought processes by looking through an art lens called Kaleidoscopic Reiki.

I’ve assembled video kaleidoscope movies of my art to include Reiki healing and relaxing music into high quality screensavers, which are now available starting at $25 downpayment. DVDs and other digital formats as listed below also now available upon request according to your needs.Paypal quality assurance and easy transactions available by sending instant payment to jilljjam@gmail.com (just click the link to open Paypal if you’d like to get this transaction going immediately).

These are moving mirror images of my art and photography. The movies below are at a lower quality for the sake of easy loading on the web and theft prevention (and yes, if you take them I can find you because they are copyrighted and watermarked). Should you be the honest type who would rather support the artist, I will in the format you prefer…mkv, mov, wmv, avi, mp4, flv, screensaver and desktop wallpapers available too, even if you want a kaleidoscope made of your own colorful image, I can certainly do that or one like one of these below in regular, high definition, NTSC, widescreen, or computer or web formats or any derivatives of this as listed above made to suit your device and screen size just fill out the inquiry form below to inquiry.

Look through the kaleidoscope posts for samples you like, contact me with your request, and I will make you up a custom kaleidoscope.
I promise, the work is more beautiful than I expected and your eyes and soul will be amazed and grateful too. We all need some beauty and fun, you need some fun images perhaps for your videos or web. True beauty and fun are good for the aura of the universe, they are good karma, buy a few for the world.
 
Prints, clothing, bedding, hats, totes, mugs, pillows; of single images, art, kaleidoscope stills, and photography are ready to purchase at the following galleries:
http://www.saatchiart.com/jilljj
http://fineartamerica.com/artists/1+jill+johnson
http://www.artpal.com/jilljj
http://jilljj.imagekind.com/
http://www.cafepress.com/jilljj
I’ll give you the stills samples first so as not to make you too dizzy
 




























Reiki Beautiful Certifications Available

If you would like to achieve certification in for Medicine Buddha Reiki, Kundalini Reiki, Fusion Reiki, Ascended Masters Reiki, Usui Shiki Ryoho Reiki, or Violet Flame Reiki, I can assist you with your attunement and make you a personalized certificate of completion for your level. After your training and attunements (3 are needed to reach master teacher level), I can send you a beautiful 8 1/2 x 11 inch certificate such as the one you see below, printed in color onto a fine white linen paper. The price for an attunement via phone by appointment with me is $20. The certificate is $10 and you can get certificates made up for whatever level you are at, 1 2, or 3=(Master Teacher). The uses of the Reiki are priceless and limitless. Fill out the form below to contact me about scheduling attunements and type of attunement you want along with which info on certificates (if you are a little color shy, I can print these up in black and white instead) contact me if you would like to get started with Reiki, otherwise known as natural healing of body, mind, soul, and spirit…..

 

For the past 20 years or so, I’ve been researching various forms of natural healing. My studies have included: yoga, tai chi, meditation, natural gardening, whole foods, ayurvedic medicine, herbal remedies, essential oils, henna, EFT tapping, psychology, art therapy, and reiki. Until the time I am able to get this wealth of information into a somewhat condensed and organized forms of books and videos, I’m offering consultations and energy healing sessions. I can combine above therapies and tips to suit your needs, so am hoping you will fill out the contact form so I can talk with you.

 

You’ll find other pages related to this throughout the rest of the site too, so please allow yourself some fun and relaxation by browsing through slowly. Namaste’

Reiki Guide Guardian Wallpaper

I have a friend who needs food, shelter, and protection.
Maybe you have a friend like this too.
I am putting out this Reiki Guardian of the Flame Wallpaper for those who are studying Medicine Buddha Reiki in hopes they will use this guide correctly and study thoroughly. I encourage much and many years to study the subjects involved in the principles and only use of this with good intent for the universe. You can use this as computer wallpaper if you want. If you would like a copy of the artwork only wallpaper, send me a contribution via paypal. The money is going for a purpose of world healing, so I won’t put a price on it when it is the thought that counts. This artwork came about as I took pictures of the birch in the Fall, I loaded the pictures into photoshop and made a kaleidoscope image of them. The little figures holding lights you see in the top middle and bottom were natural occurrences and I literally jumped out of my chair as I saw the guardians of the flame appear. It was probably the most magical thing I’ve ever witnessed while doing art, and the image has been nudging me towards a study of natural healing with light, frequencies, metaphysics, reiki, and the like.

guardian of the flame medicine buddha symbolism and mantra study

guardian of the flame medicine buddha symbolism and mantra study

Catharticism is getting rid of a Naugahyde bar

I’ve literally been getting plastered since Spring, So far I’ve gone through 4 five gallon buckets of plaster and will likely need more by Winter. Today I went through 1/3 a bucket, got some in may hair, ceiling work is challenging that way. If you need Venetian plaster, sculptural plaster art on walls, painting, faux finish, or other stucco or plaster texture work done, give me a ring, I’ve come to be an expert by practice, and no I don’t drink but I do get really plastered and look like a dropcloth on paint and plaster days.

100_0001 100_0013 100_0014 100_0015 100_0016 100_0017 100_0018 100_0019 100_0020 100_0021 100_0022 100_0023 100_0024 100_0025 100_0026

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This old house really needed attention and fixing. It had: 500 staples (at least) in the upper attic room, holes in the closet wall where someone chopped at it with a screwdriver, a crooked ugly Naugahyde bar on a sloped foundation with a crooked cutout in the wall and finish work attached with 4″ barn nails and carpet glue was a cathartic experience unlike any other to get rid of…there is now a textured wall where the bar used to be and I could not be more pleased to have told the previous owner yesterday that he would not believe what we did with his bar scene (the only pathetic remnants we have left of his tasteless decor is the saloon scene we left in the closet just to mock what requires mocking, the previous owner also left us with carpet glue and staples that held up the uninspired kitsch ripped wallpaper of ducks in beige, and worn out carpet scraps that should have gone in a dumpster 20 years ago were unceremoniously and heartily ripped from their roots to be throw out the window asap. Most walls were in need of fresh paint at the least, the attic room had a dark and foreboding paneling, so for those of you who cannot stand paneling like I cannot stand paneling….I HAVE COME UP WITH A SOLUTION. Trade secret though. If you must get rid of annoyances such as the above, you’ll have to hire me. I made the panel walls into Venetian plaster with horse  sculptural art. This is my master’s thesis in old home repair. The last house took 14 years, this should be accomplished as done enough within a year of my rare spare time. I found a floor under that scrap carpet that now looks great painted, and a floor that remind me of my best friends’ when we were young, the whole room looks young again. For the moment I can do you Venetian plaster or stucco and painting right or left handed, sideways, on a ladder and upside down. Wallpapering was a cinch. I’m sure I left out a few annoyances I could help the right person fix, but that would mean a consultation with me if you are up to it.

The Art of Minnie Evans Driver: Creation of Ordered Art In A Disordered Environment

The Art of Minnie Evans Driver:
Creation of Ordered Art In A Disordered Environment
Jill A. Johnson
Course 612: History & Theory of Art Therapy
Unit 2: Outsider Art
Instructor: Penny Orr
WEU

Abstract
In this essay I will recount the history of an important outside artist of the 20th century who utilized art as a therapeutic tool to adapt to a difficult environment. Connections will be made between the artist and her art and; theories of Ellen Dissanayake, Carl Jung, Sigmund Freud, D.C. Geary, and R. Sapolsky, to demonstrate the use of self-taught art as an important means of adaptation and coping in difficult circumstances.
Keywords: art, therapy, artist, therapeutic, Minnie Evans Driver, Carl Jung, Sigmund Freud, Ellen Dissanayake, psychology, psychologist, theory, dream, symbolism, subconscious, collective, conscious, nurture, nature, order, self, adaptation, environment, spiritual, meditation, mandala,

The life of Minnie Evans Driver 1892-1987
In my estimation, the driving force behind the art of Minnie Driver consisted of an underlying impulse to create order and beauty in a life of harsh realities and disappointments. Her daily life consisted of hardships such as servile work, poverty, abandonment, and likely misunderstanding. Her circumstances would not have afforded her guidance or acceptance, but her art could afford and reward her.

According to Petullo, A. Collection of SELF-TAUGHT AND OUTSIDER ART. 2014, Minnie was born in a cabin in North Carolina to an impoverished fourteen-year-old servant who abandoned her to her Grandmother’s care when she was only 2 months old. Her Father also abandoned the family. Current research by Ellen Dissanayake would flag this situation as dangerous for a child developmentally, as we will see further on in this paper. Some of Ms. Driver’s ancestors were from Trinidad Africa, and were known to be strong women. This “strong” trait may have been passed on to Minnie, but it seems Minnie did not receive the nurturing necessary to a healthy development because she was forced to rely solely upon her own guidance for most of her young life. She attended school until the 6th grade, and then quit so she could work as a “caller”, selling shellfish on the street, to help what little family she had left.

It is, therefore, not surprising that Ms. Driver had frequent hallucinations which continued for most of her life and were likely due to the stressors of abandonment and poverty. I believe Ellen Dissanayake and any other psychologists mentioned in this paper would agree that we have a case of someone who was damaged at such a young and critical age that therapy would be difficult also. Ms. Driver also said she always remembered her dreams. Hallucinations were also often part of her waking hours, many times disorienting enough that reality and the subconscious became a blur. And maybe the vast intellect of dreams and hallucinations were serving a purpose of protecting her when reality became too much to bear. She kept her subconscious thoughts to herself, and it is doubtful someone in her position would have had the empathetic ear of a good supporter much less the psychologist she needed. I think in cases of mental breaks as these the mind “shields” itself with buffers of thoughts that are more tolerable than real life. Real life can be very inhumane, people do break under pressure. In this case, Jung refers to innate abilities of humans to connect with a more universal consciousness through these symbols (Jung), myth, and stories, she became strong enough to survive. I would refer to these hallucinations as is interesting though, that at 43 she chose art and symbolism as a means of expression which seemingly provided her mechanisms to cope with a harsh set of environmental circumstances.

Despite the lack of formal education, Minnie enjoyed reading history, mythology, and the bible (and was very steeped in the principles of Baptist faith). I believe the images she created later in her life arose partially at least from the mythology and symbolism she experienced in the dreams and hallucinations she kept so closely guarded.

Minnie did not start doing artwork until she was 43. Here we see a theme that was common in her paintings: florals, symbolism, and mythical looking creatures at times. She claimed she never planned her art, it just “came to her”. I am again reminded of Jung’s theories about self, mythology, universal consciousness, and the subconscious all at once. Here we also see similarity to works more often produced in India by gurus and mystics to which she likely had no exposure.

We will never know the full content of the vast amounts of dreams she claimed to remember. Minnie remembered all of her dreams. In my opinion, dreams are difficult to recall. I have an acquaintance who claims she does not ever remember dreams. If dreams are the untapped part of not less. This tells me she was dealing quite will with her subconscious in a society where the subconscious (Freud, Jung), I believe they deserve further attention and acknowledgement, natural impulses of the subconscious are denied and subjugated to such an extent that mental illness blooms. With her artwork we see a flower still blooming even through the abstraction.

Perhaps the reason she kept her hallucinations and dreams so closely guarded was the reality that the paintings resulting from her dreams and hallucinations would not be widely accepted in a society that could not understand the value of art as her coping mechanism. And it could be the case that her rearrangements of florals were actually recollections of dreams. I personally would have to rely on Photoshop (see comparative art above) to accomplish mandala-like artwork similar to hers. In our western culture, it is rare to see abstracted works such as these by any artist, much less an untrained woman artist with black heritage. Mandalas artwork tends to be accepted more readily in Indian and Asian cultures where the continuum of nature is a main ingredient in resultant spiritual beliefs and art. No doubt it was difficult at best for Minnie Evans Driver to fit into the narrow linear idea that so many Westerners subscribe to, that is, “good art” is “realistic” art.

We could also discuss the difficulties of women artists of the period, but to do so would be beyond the scope of this paper. We know she was a servant, and that we “ought to” treat people better. This story is heartbreaking to me. My beloved Grandmother and my Godmother were both hardworking Farmers and Housecleaners who could also be considered in the running at least for being the outside artists they were. We are Strong! I am a Farmer, an Artist, a Housecleaner. My Godmother says “You can hold your head up, UP!”, we are people who can say we have nothing to be ashamed of in our work or treatment of others (jilljj.com), but my own parallels with Ms. Driver are also beyond to scope of this paper.

If her art was of dreams, she was manifesting wish fulfillment (according to theory on interpretation of dreams by Sigmund Freud), then Ms. Driver was able to fulfill her wish through her dreams and art. It seems perfectly logical then, to guard oneself out of necessity. And this leads me to believe that she was using a form of meditation not unlike seasoned monks and seers, perhaps without knowing how important this universal connection with nature was. In any case, according to Jung’s theory of symbolism as I understand it, she was connecting to a universal consciousness and dealing with her subconscious dreams, which enabled her to find belonging so she could more fully “live” her life.

In my estimation, the driving force behind the art of Minnie Driver consisted of an underlying impulse to create order and beauty in a life of harsh realities and disappointments. Ms. Driver’s daily life consisted of hardships such as servile work, poverty, abandonment, and likely misunderstanding. Her circumstances would not have afforded her guidance or acceptance, but her art could afford and reward her.

Ellen Dissanayake speaks of the importance of the Mother-Child connection. It is therefore not surprising that Ms. Driver had frequent hallucinations due to the stressors of abandonment and poverty. It is interesting though, that she chose art and symbolism as a means of expression which seemingly provided her a coping mechanisms to cope with a harsh set of environmental circumstances. We will never know the full content of the vast amounts of dreams she claimed to remember. “I have never remembered sleeping without [dreaming].” The words of Minnie Evans from her 1998 exhibition at Luise Ross Gallery, New York If dreams are the untapped part of the subconscious (Freud, Jung), I believe they deserve further attention and acknowledgement, not less. This tells me she the subconscious are denied and subjugated to such an extent that mental illness blooms. With her artwork we see a flower still blooming even through the abstraction. She was dealing quite well with her subconscious in a society where the ascetic impulses of formalism did not allow her a voice.

Perhaps the reason she kept her hallucinations and dreams so closely guarded was the reality that the paintings resulting from her dreams and hallucinations would not be widely accepted in a society that could not understand the value of art as her coping mechanism. And it could be the case that her rearrangements of florals were actually recollections of dreams. I personally would have to rely on Photoshop (see comparative art above) to accomplish mandala-like artwork similar to hers. In our western culture, it is rare to see abstracted works such as these by any artist, much less an untrained woman artist. Mandalas artwork tends to be accepted more readily in Indian and Asian cultures where the continuum of nature is a main ingredient in resultant spiritual beliefs and art. No doubt it was difficult at best for Minnie Driver to fit into the narrow linear idea that so many Westerners subscribe to, that is, “good art” is “realistic” art. I hear art by Terry Redlin is “good” too, but have enough moxy to avoid further judgement.

If her art was of dreams, she was manifesting wish fulfillment then. Ms.Driver was able to fulfil her wishes through her dreams and art. It seems perfectly logical then, to guard oneself out of necessity. And this leads me to believe that she was using a form of meditation not unlike seasoned monks and seers, perhaps without knowing how important this universal connection with nature was. In any case, according to Jung’s theory of symbolism as in interpretation of dreams by Sigmund Freud, she was connecting to a universal consciousness and dealing with her subconscious dreams, which enabled her to find belonging so she could more fully “live” her life.

Ms. Evans got married just after her sixteenth birthday, and it seems the relationship was positive and strong. Minnie and her husband continued work as servants and had 3 sons. Likely due to the amount of responsibilities, Mrs. Driver did not start painting until she was 43 (not unlike my Grandma Alice) (jilljj.com/news). At that time she was working as a gatekeeper at an estate where she later sold some of her paintings. Let’s face it, we all have voices in our heads, and Minnie’ voice told her to “paint or die” (Evans Driver). I can relate. So can you.

About her paintings, Evans stated: “I have no imagination. I never plan a drawing. They just happen.”(2) I agree with her first statement. Her imagination was fueled by her dreams and memories though, I think. “As she began drawing compulsively, her family became concerned that she was losing her mind” (Evans). This behavior signals genius in my opinion and is something to be assisted and not insulted by ignorance. I’d guess her family had a tough time dealing with a woman taking charge of her own life. Her painting began to sell at the gatehouse where her work became noticed enough for her to finally be gaining exposure in major art galleries.
She retired in 1974. She worked for approximately 70 years altogether!

With the encouragement and assistance of her agent and friend, Evans work was widely exhibited. According to the exhibition catalogue Black Folk Artists: Minnie Evans and Bill Traylor from the African American Museum,

The Theory of Sapolsky
“Prolonged stress is known to compromise a wide range of bodily functions including energy release, immune system activity, mental activity, digestion, growth and tissue repair, and reproductive physiology and behavior. An individual’s perceived sense of coping with a provoking situation affects the degree of severity of the response and influences whether or not a stress disorder occurs (Sapolsky 1992). It seems Ms. Driver was severely impacted by stress disorders of hallucinations.

The Theory of Geary
It is adaptively advantageous for individuals to cope (or feel that they are coping) with circumstances that provoke stress (Geary 2005). I think Ms. Driver “coped” with her disadvantages through art and mythology.

The theory of Ellen Dissanayake
I suggest that ceremonies originated and persisted because the aesthetic operations (artifications) served, as in mother-infant interaction, to attract attention (to the matter of the ceremony), create, mold, and sustain emotion, coordinate body and brain rhythms, and—by doing all these—to provide in individuals and group… the feeling that they were coping. (Dissanayake). In addition to pointing out these practical benefits of the arts that were inherent in Pleistocene lives, this chapter has also described inborn aesthetic capacities that evolved to help individuals satisfy fundamental emotional needs. The problems that beset twenty- first century children and adults generally have to do with the five emotional needs described in section 5: feeling intimacy with one other person (mutuality), feeling that one is integral to a group and has an identity with regard to others (belonging), feeling physically and mentally capable to make one’s way in the world and to deal with the practical and social problems that arise (competence), feeling a sense of purpose and value in the world and in what one does (meaning), and being able to demonstrate regard for one’s life, showing oneself and others that one cares (artifying). Although these needs are largely fulfilled in societies of intimates in which ceremonial arts are prominent, they are easily neglected in complex, modern, pluralistic, highly technological, largely secular societies where art-filled ceremonies are fragmented and often disparaged and where there is more complex (and one might say “inhuman”) information to be acquired and mastered. It is not sufficiently realized that the arts can contribute to addressing these emotional needs. (Dissanayake). Ms. Driver exhibits a penchant for “ceremonial” and symbolic art, which probably helped her achieve a sense of society when her family could not provide one.

The Theories of Carl Jung
“My thesis then, is as follows: in addition to our immediate consciousness, which is of a thoroughly personal nature and which we believe to be the only empirical psyche (even if we tack on the personal unconscious as an appendix), there exists a second psychic system of a collective, universal, and impersonal nature which is identical in all individuals. This collective unconscious does not develop individually but is inherited. It consists of pre-existent forms, the archetypes, which can only become conscious secondarily and which give definite form to certain psychic contents.” Ms. Driver was fully aware of her dreams and hallucinations, making them a couscous part of her daily life.
The comparative method is the basic key to a symbolic understanding of mythology. Through it we discover certain patterns which recur in widely varying cultures separated by an immensity of both distance and time. Jung called these underlying patterns ‘archetypes’ from ‘arche’ meaning primordial, and ‘typos’ meaning typical. Archetypal images embody the most essential elements of the human experience and drama. They manifest both as powerful images, and as dynamic behavioral patterns. They are a repertoire of instinctive human functioning, analogous in our species to the instinctive impulse that impels, say, the Baltimore Oriole to build a beautiful teardrop nest, or Salmon to return to the streams of their birth. The generality of these images result from recurrent reactions of human beings to situations and stimuli of the same general order, repeated over thousands of years. It was through Ms. Driver’s understanding of mythological images she was able to manifest art.
The archetypal images represent several basic stages of the life drama symbolized by the Hero myth. They lead from an initial stage of unconsciousness before the ego has awakened, through various stages of heroic struggle, to a final state of ‘wholeness’ or integration when life has reached its full potential and a relationship between the human and divine has been reestablished. Jung called this process ‘individuation,’ the process of becoming the true individual that one really is. This ‘true self’ Jung felt to be the dynamic factor in the unconscious of each individual. It represents the central archetype of order and wholeness among the other archetypes. Jung called it the Self.” Although Ms Driver was not afforded psychological treatment of her breaks, she found her way through life by utilizing mythology and art her own form of self-therapy.

Conclusion
In my estimation, the driving force behind the art of Minnie Driver consisted of an underlying impulse to create order and beauty in a life of harsh realities and disappointments. Ms. Driver’s daily life consisted of hardships such as servile work, poverty, abandonment, and likely misunderstanding. Her circumstances would not have afforded her guidance or acceptance, but her art could afford and reward her.

References
Dissanayake, Ellen. In The Beginning: Pleistocene And Infant Aesthetics And Twenty-First Century Education In The Arts International Handbook of Research in Arts Education, ed. Liora Bressler, Chapter 53, Vol. 2 (2007), 783-798.
Freud, Sigmund. http://.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Interpretation_of_Dreams (2014)
Freud, Sigmund The Interpretation of Dreams the Illustrated Edition, Sterling Press, 2010, pages 9-68
Geary, D. C. (2005). Folk knowledge and academic learning. In B. J. Ellis & D. F. Bjorklund (Eds.), Origins of the social mind: evolutionary psychology and child development (pp. 493-519). New York: Guilford.
C. G. Jung, The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (London 1996) p. 43
C. G. Jung, Man and his Symbols (London 1978) p. 57
Kalshed, D., Jones, A., C.J. Jung Foundation For Analytical Psychology, Inc. The Evolution of Consciousness.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man_and_His_Symbols
Petullo, A. Collection of SELF-TAUGHT AND OUTSIDER ART. 2014
Sapolsky, R. (1992). Neuroendocrinology of the stress response. In J. R. Becker, S. M. Breedlove, & D. Crews (Eds.), Behavioral Endocrinology (pp. 287-324). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Judith Rubin Essay APA style

Judith Rubin: Art Therapist
By
Jill Annette Johnson

A thesis
submitted to
World Education University
in partial satisfaction of the requirements
for the course
Art Therapy 612

Supervised by
Dr. Penny Orr

February 13, 2015

Judith Rubin: Art Therapist
Author: Jill Annette Johnson
Supervisor: Dr. Penny Orr

Abstract
   
Art Therapy is founded on principles that use art as an expressive healing mechanism. Judith Rubin is one Art Therapist who recognized and used these principles in service to people of all ages throughout her career. Ms. Rubins cleared a path for many subsequent Art Therapists by leaving us a plethora of documentation in the form of books, films, and journal articles, and of course a history rich in enhancement of the human condition through art.

Key Words:

Acknowledgements
I’d like to extend my special thanks to my former art teachers and professors: Ren Holland, Dennis Billig, Leslie Brown, Myrle Sykora, Alice Pantzke, Lars Nilson, Bill Ellingson and Hap Johnson, You are always a part of the choices I make about how I view the world and what I can do with such vision. I’ve learned to: take many gorgeous pictures with my eyes, change perspective when needed, apply theory of color as desired, employ transparency and iridescence often and in moderation, add form to make it matter, draw big so I may also draw small, navigate as I careen down expert mountains to the lush valley and resize, finish the picture with a custom mat and accentuating frame, write my heart right, and to make use of nature’s gifts is a gift to myself. And I cannot forget to include the optometrist who saw into my eyes the importance of a proper prescription and fitted me with the perfect prismatic glasses in trade for some chokecherry jelly. Thank you for sharing your vision & wisdom!
Contents
Introduction 1
detailed analysis 2
Conclusion 3
References 4
Appendix: List of Abbreviations Links AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 5

Judith Rubin: Art Therapist
Introduction

I chose to write about Judith Rubin due to a bit of similarity in our paths. I was raised with the Lutheran faith, worked with the experts of life at a young age (at sixteen I worked as a nurses’ aide in a retirement home) where I would on occasion sing and play guitar for the minuscule chapel services. I learned these people had few outlets for the occupational therapy called crochet, and always suspected I could help such people make art that interested them if given the chance. Art Therapy was a child in the mid 1970’s though, as we will find by looking at the pioneering art therapy work of Judith Rubin. Me as she, worked for a spell as Art Teachers: I was a Lutheran gal in a private Catholic school, she was a progressive type in the same type of conservative suit I wore. I opted to teach multicultural art that included freedom of movement and meditation, and this was not proper form by the book according to administration. Lectures, tests, and sitting still would have been “the proper by the assertive (passive/aggressive) book” of the day. My aim was to be a mentor and not a jailer, so I’d agree with her decision to not use the paddle when the art process is proactive and meaningful to students who are in fact individuals with individual requirements, a fact we still need to come to terms with in the scope of the machinery of education. Neither one of us conformed to the strict educational expectations since it would not make sense to do so in art, a medium that requires freedom of expression. Neither of us found teaching fulfilling in this respect. But to really help people find more happiness and balance through art is something I believe we had in common, and we aim to do so with Art Therapy.
Detailed Analysis
Ms Rubin’s career is a mass of accomplishment in the Art field. An Art major at Wellesley College, Judy earned a Master’s degree in Art at Harvard in 1959 (the year I was born), a Ph at the University of Pittsburgh, and completed training in Adult and Child Analysis at the Pittsburgh Psychoanalytic Institute.

Judy’s a past President and Honorary Life Member of the American Art Therapy Association. In 2006 she was nominated for the National Medal in the Arts. As a Licensed Psychologist and a Board-Certified Art Therapist, she has worked with people of every age group and condition. She is a Faculty member of the Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh Psychoanalytic Institute.

Rubin discovered that while she did love working with children, she did not fit in well (just as I loved my students and was told when it was time for me to leave my teaching at the private Catholic Institution called high school), things being as they were or maybe still are.
As instructors, she (and I) were charged with disruption because of too much singing, rearranging furniture, declining to use stencils for art or paddles for discipline, and failing to write detailed lesson plans, while showing slides of artwork that were not in the curriculum. The very same things happened to me, except I had to ward off the harassments of the Principal by backing him up against the wall and threatening lawsuit in front of the Physics class. In may case I hear it made an indelible impression on the students. Although she (and I) could see that youngsters benefited from making art, her teaching experiences (and mine), were less satisfying than (we) hoped (Rubin, 2006).

Rubin got her first taste of art therapy at a local Child Study Center nursery where she volunteered as a director of a study of art therapy. I got my first taste at the Boy’s and Girls Club where I volunteered, but had no subsequent opportunity and did not know there was a such thing as art therapy as a job. I am a little older and wiser now, and it’s about time I got my Master’s, so I’m following suit and am moving towards Art Therapy.

Rubin began doing art therapy with hospitalized schizophrenics in 1963 without the background training (just as I had to do as an aide at the nursing home I worked at, and with a few children and adults I’ve known along the way). It’s no surprise though that she would want to find advice about how to work with these people better, so she wanted advice about becoming “real” art therapist. Dr. Rubin found doing art with people rewarding in itself.
It was while working on research that she discovered a number of Margaret Naumburg’s early papers which gave her the guidance she needed to become an Art Therapist.

In 1964, Rubin presented a case to Professor Erik Erikson of Harvard University. Yes, that Erikson, the one we now study in our psychology books. Much to her surprise, Erikson opposed the idea of her obtaining clinical training in psychology.He suggested it might hinder or ruin, the intuitive approach she had been following.
With that advice, she postponed further clinical study fora number of years, (Rubin, 2006)
I was considering clinical research too…..

Pioneers in their fields, art therapist Judy Rubin and drama therapist Ellie Irwin, founded EMI (Expressive Media, Inc.) in 1985. In 1963 Judy initiated a form of art therapy program at (WPIC) Western Psychiatric Institute & Clinic. In 1981 Judy and Ellie developed and Co-Chaired the Department of Creative & Expressive Arts Therapies (CEAT) at WPIC. In 1985 they founded EMI, to be able to disseminate films and videotapes about the arts in therapy. Got that? PBS x (WPIC + CEAT )= EMI + AATA= ATR-BC squared.

One of the interesting things about Judy Rubin is the fact that she began her career as the art lady for the TV show “Mr Rogers”. Judy saw the power of the media firsthand with Mr Rogers on PBS. I worked at a few newspapers and publishing companies, we both had that commercial influence. I watched Captain Kangaroo & Mr. Green Jeans. Thanks to Mr. Green Jeans I appreciate Farming, am a Farmer now so I must deal with it.

Inspired by “Looking for Me,” a film by dance therapist Janet Adler, Judy and Ellie made several films which have recently been revised. While writing “Art Therapy: An Introduction”, Judy made a film to illustrate its contents, “Art Therapy Has Many Faces”. This generated a commission with the American Art Therapy Association (AATA) for the film “Beyond Words” which has been re-mastered and is now available on a new DVD, “Art Therapy With Older Adults”. Another film she did was, “You Can Learn a Lot from a Lobster,” which demonstrates an assessment technique for families, “The Family Puppet Interview”. These films demonstrate work with normal adults and children, as well as with autistic youngsters. Both are available in DVD, titled “Dance Therapy and Authentic Movement”.
Her 2010 work included “Creative Healing in Mental Health: Art & Drama in Assessment & Therapy”.

Her current work still includes “Art Therapy Has Many Faces,” which is award-winning and a very popular multilingual film she hopes to disseminate future art therapists. This project was made possible through co-sponsorship by arts therapies organizations in Europe and Asia.
Dr Rubin continually paves the way for future therapists, and has gone worldwide.

She wrote many many journal articles during her career, I mention them briefly but since she did so many I think it’s beyond the scope of the paper to list everything she did. Let’s put it this way, she has energy. She did.

Since 1978, Judith Aron Rubin’s Child Art Therapy Book has become the classic text for conducting art therapy with children. There is now a Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Edition, which illustrates art therapy approaches to actual therapy settings on dvd, this pioneering guide works to train, inform, and inspire a new generation of art therapists and those seeking to introduce art into their clinical practice. Through her experience, Ms. Rubin has set on film the conditions for creative growth, provides assessments of progress, and goals for therapy that can be used individually, in groups, with those healthy or disabled, no-one is left of of her art therapy. Her techniques exude expression in various formats such as; scribbles, drawings, stories, poems, masks, to name a few.

I looked her up on Linked In and hope to continue this paper by talking with her. Let’s see if two busy women can compare these notes. I hope she can find the time. She appears quite young at heart and happy yet in recent pictures I see of her, and it might take some doing to keep up with that Art Lady.

Conclusion
Dr. Rubin’s story has no conclusion. Instead she opens the horizons for continued use of art therapy. I am glad to have been introduced to the woman who was the “art lady” on Mr. Roger’s Neighborhood” who made great strides to bring art therapy into a more expressive common use. What can I say? I found a new hero who had many accomplishments, so this thesis turned out to be longer than necessary. Thanks Dr. Rubin!

References
American Art Therapy Association. (2010) National Conference Program. Sacramento, CA.
Expressive Media Inc. [mission statement]. Retrieved from (http://www.expressivemedia.org/ emi.html) on October 22, 2010.
Rubin, J. A. (2005). Child art therapy (rev. ed.). New York, New York: John Wiley & Sons.
Rubin, J. A. (2006). Judith A. rubin: An ugly duckling finds the swans or how I fell in love with art therapy. In M. B. Junge, & H. Wadeson (Eds.), Architects of art therapy: Memoirs and life stories. (pp. 105–121). Springfield, IL, US: Charles C. Thomas Publisher.
Rubin, J.A. (2010a). [Curriculum vitae]. http://www.expressivemedia.org/pdfs/judycv.pdf
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_A._Rubin
Rubin, J. A. (2010b). Introduction to art therapy: Sources & resources (rev. ed.). New York, New York: Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group.

APPENDIX:
List of Abbreviations
EMI: Expressive Media, Inc.
WPIC: Western Psychiatric Institute & Clinic
PCGC: Pittsburgh Child Guidance Center
CEAT: Creative & Expressive Arts Therapies
ATR: Registered Art Therapist
ATR-BC: Board Certified Art Therapist
AATA: American Art Therapy Association
PBS: Public Broadcasting Service

List of Accomplishments (Some of them)

Judith Rubin has contributed to the field of art therapy by serving in a number of professional positions as well as writing numerous articles, books, lectures and films.
Rubin became a Registered Art Therapist (ATR) in 1970 as well as a Board Certified Art Therapist (ATR-BC) in 1994 (Rubin, 2010a).
She served on the American Art Therapy Association (AATA) board from 1973 to 1979, including as president from 1977 to 1979.
In 1981, she received the award for Honorary Life Member (American Art Therapy Association).
In addition to her writing, Rubin has worked in private practice and has taught at many universities.
She is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at University of Pittsburgh where she has been faculty since 1974 and also has served as faculty-by-invitation with the Pittsburgh Psychoanalytic Institute since 1983.
She is co-founder and president of a nonprofit educational organization called Expressive Media Inc.
Rubin’s other books include The Art of Art Therapy (1984, rev 2001), Art Therapy: An Introduction (1998), Artful Therapy (2005), and Introduction to Art Therapy: Sources and Resources (2009).
Having started in television in the late sixties with “Mr Rogers Neighborhood” continues to make films.
Her first film in 1972, “We’ll Show You What We’re Gonna Do” documented a therapeutic art program with blind children.
Shortly after, she created “Children and the Arts”,which highlighted the therapeutic value of arts when dealing with children who have been at-risk for problem behavior.
Since then, she has created six other films: “Beyond Words” (art therapy with older adults), “Breakthrough” (artists in analytic therapy), “Art Therapy: A Universal Language for Healing” (art therapy around the world), “Yes You Can” (art therapy for people with disabilities), and “Art Therapy Has Many Faces” (now subtitled in 14 languages).
With Eleanor Irwin, she has produced “The Green Creature Within” (multimodal therapy with adolescents), and “Creative Healing in Mental Health” (art and drama in assessment and therapy).
These reflect her involvement with film as an artistic medium, to educate both the public and professionals about the healing power of the arts, is an actualization of Rubin’s goals as a person and an art therapist.“An ugly duckling finds the swans or how I fell in love with art therapy”, Architects of art therapy: Memoirs and life stories.
Introduction to art therapy: Sources & resources (rev 1974).
Present Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh.
1983 Present Faculty-By-Invitation, Pittsburgh Psychoanalytic Institute.
1979 Licensed Psychologist State of Pennsylvania.
Mr Rogers Neighborhood, WQED-TV, Public Broadcasting.
1976 1981 Board of Directors, National Committee*Arts for the Handicapped (Very Special Arts).
June 1977 Invitational Conference on the Healing Role of the Arts, Rockefeller Foundation.
1978 1979 Task Panel on Arts in Therapy, President’s Commission on Mental Health.
2007 Present Advisory Committee, Asia Pacific Art Therapy Center.
1959 Pi Lambda Theta Award, Harvard Graduate School of Education.
1974 Outstanding Teachers in Exceptional Education.
1981 Honorary Life Membership, American Art Therapy Association.
Art therapy in a community mental health center for children:
Expressive & Creative Arts Methods for Trauma Survivors.